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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives usña rich man' look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> never too early for pollst
they're troubled by what the united nations ambassador susan rice is telling them. and now the acting cia director has some serious problems as well. president obama pulls out all the stops to keep middle class taxes low, but will congress go along with higher taxes for the rich? plus, a long secret u.s. plan, get this, to explode an atomic bomb on the moon. what were they thinking? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> today we may be at the tipping point for one of the most important decisions president obama needs to make as he begins his second term. on capitol hill republicans including moderate republicans are sending the president a clear warning, don't nominate susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. rice is the current u.s. ambassador to the united nations. she spent a second day meeting with senators trying to explain some of her inaccurate comments she made after the september 11th terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. cnn's senior congressional correspondent dana bash is joining us now from capitol hill with the ver
house. in new york, yesterday the united nations recognizing palestine as -- with a new observer status at the united nations. the u.s. voted against it for all of the wrong reasons, i believe, and the rebels in syria showing more and more strength and gaining more and more territory. we have a lot to talk about this morning. good to have you with us. don't forget, you can join the conversation any time at 866-55-press. on twitter@bp show on facebook facebook.com/billpressshow. and there is this great little fun thing called the chat room going on all through the next three hours. we go to current.com and click on the chat room. join other listeners on your local progressive talk radio station. talk about the issues we are talking about. there we go. team press put in a whole week. >> believe it or not. >> talking points this week. peter ogburn. >> all right. >> with sipcyprian bowlding. and he is still -- i know, you think he has spent six bucks yet. >> four bucks. i don't know. i don't know how he spent it. >> to dinner last night. >> could
. you will see the united nations get -- get a united states shot on the arms control treaties that the united nations launch and they will supercede the constitution of the united states. that's where they're headed. >> oh, my god! >> this from the guy who sent weapons to the iranians, funding right wing death squads. and lied about it all. >> very glenn beckish right? going to be a world government. united nations is going to be -- you know, dictating american law and things like that. look, all of the crazy talk they did for the first four years and then we had election -- the american people said yeah, we like that guy. none of this is -- i think they're going to spin the tales for four more years because they sound, for that echochamber it sounds fun. >> stephanie: ben stein on o'reilly. >> a lot of angry, bitter people out there. they've got to attack something. so they attack christmas. they're not -- i don't consider them well in the head. >> what! >> nobody is being forced to bow down and worship anybody.
-assad in syria may resort to using chemical weapons on his own people. in the meantime, the united nations is hint thag there wil hinting that there will be no asylum for bashar al-assad as the syrian dictator makes it clear that he will die before leaving the country under any circumstances. what is going on behind the scenes, for that we turn to corn powell following all the latest developments from our mideast bureau in jerusalem. connor. >> reporter: the international and internal pressure is mounting on bashar al-assad today. secretary clinton reiterated her comments that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for the united states and that there would be consequences. we are also hearing that bashar al-assad is beginning to look for asylum around the world. he is reaching out to world leaders in latin america, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascu
change conference from the united nations still going on. what do you expect to come out of it. >> unfortunately, virtually nothing. look, we've been having these conferences for 20 years where all the governments of the world get together and try to promise to cut carbon emissions, but the reason why we can't do that is because carbon is the side effect of stuff we like. it's the electricity we have in here, it's all the great things that fossil fuels provide. stuart: what should be the global fix to the co 2 emissions problem? what would you recommend? >> well, fundamentally, as long as green energy is much more expensive than fossil fuels you're never going to convince, certainly not china and india, but not even the u.s. and europeans, that you need to innovate the price down and that's the solutions pretty much every place. >> we haven't got the technology. >> and you expect that? >> absolutely, so the point is stop putting up inefficient solar panels now. but make sure you get them to be cheap enough everyone will want them in decades. >> your judge is that a carbon tax m
of the interim government of mali, ecowas, the african union, the united nations, neighboring states and others in the international community to prepare a military response in accordance with international law, address the threat of terrorists and extremists in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed, we think, to a change in some of the northern groups, as witnessed by the recent willingness to have mnla and other members to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept proposed by ecowas and endorsed by the african union provides a found eags for planning a proposed military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well resourced, and appropriate. these issues include among other things the required force levels, the cost in funding needs, the logistical requirement the operational timeliness, the protection of civilians and ensuring that the proposed military action is adequately linked to a political strategy and an end state for military
misleading, but just to be clear, when you have a position where your and ambassador to the united nations, you go well beyond classified talking points in your daily responsibilities, and that is troubling to me as well, i am a person that got -- does not know anything about this and i am going on every single show. is part of our responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to review much more than that. >> before anybody could make an intelligent decision about someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more. we don't have to see the fbi interviews of the survivors to know that -- will have the basic information about what was said and shared in congress as of this day. i remember the episode very well. it did not have the information to make informed decisions about john bolton the ambassador, and democrats dug in their heels saying we are not going to vote or consider this nomination until we get basic answers to our concerns. all i can tell you is the concerns i had are greater today than they were before. we are not even close to getting the basic answers. >> i have
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 398. the nays are two. one recorded as present. 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the question on agreg to the speaker's approval of the journal on which the yeas and nays were ordered. the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expr
to a kr credible location. >> and the obama administration is saying what the united nations did unilaterally was a setback. do you agree with that? the body i represent is split. some people are in favor of the u.s. vote. the truth of it, the only thing that will work to deliver a palestinian state side-by-side with a secure state of israel is peace. as you can see we have a chance now. the president has been re-elected. i know he's deeply personally committed to this and we just have to regrip it, i'm afraid. >> what's gone wrong? >> it's partly because there's so much turmoil in the region right now. it's how each side views its own prospects. >> how would you characterize a credible negotiation given the fact as long as we've been alive there's been these problems that keep erupting and never, ever get solved? we've been trying for 20, 30 years. it was 50, 60 years before we got one that worked. and actually back in the year 2000, and again in 2008, you have no option in the end. the only thing that works is to make it credible if we shape the negotiations. give it some shape
times." the united nations has voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. shsymbolic victory that palestinians hope will strengthen their hand in future peace talks. both the u.s. and israel strongly object to the move, arguing that palestinians must first recognize israel's right to exist before gaining new rights at the u.n. >>> all right. harold, let's do "the l.a. times." >> i enjoyed watching him do it. >> i'm getting nervous. "los angeles times." a new study finds ice sheet melting in greenland and an antarctica, more than 300 billion tons of glacial ice are lost each year. the earth's sea level has risen eight inches since pre-industrialization times. >> that was a good read. you were overemphasizing a tad bit, but i like it. i'll give you some lessons. >> my posture, do i do this? >> you just want to be centered. you want to be strength, warmth, confidence is what you want to exude. you want to cluster some words so you don't bore people. >> i thought i was talking too fast. >> in my next life, i'm going to be a consultant and teach people how to t
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
/11, 2001, and talk to a nations, of very international crowd and ask what they thought of the united states, admired the united states and they resented the united states because it that time they didn't believe there were any boundaries to what could be done. that looks at the united states as the most innovative place in the world, constantly pull rabbits out of the hat and reinvent itself. go around world today facie a nation constrained, tied down, exhausted, limited, militarily overreaching, economically--even talking to tim geithner, can you go around and tell other economies what to do when you're in a glass house? it has been real limiting. when you look at barack obama's first meeting with angela merkel in london when the global economy was on fire is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet. we are not going to play by your rules. we are not going to spend like you are telling us to do. it has been interesting as a superpower to look at all limits we have even influencing a nation like germany. and yet brussels i asked to you think america has the same growth we once had that could
such as the united states that is accustomed to telling other nations to be responsible should on the one big problem concerning the future of the global economy show itself to be a responsible power. imagine that. china which we know doesn't play fair on chair or valuing currencies basically calling the u.s. irresponsible. and you know what? you can't argue with them. they are not wrong. our politicians have made it so a socialist government in france is looking to mimic us and a communist government is mocking us. take a look at the markets today. the dow jones industrial average had a burst at the close. it was up at 30 points
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done. i only hope and pray when i'm 65 years old that bill in half as good shape or half as active as you. mr. smith: i yield to minutes to the gentleman from texas, quico canseco. mr. canseco: i thank my friend and colleague for yielding to me. i rise to honor a great man, a great texan, and a great american, ralph
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
to a balance plan to put our national debt act down to sustainable levels. the united states i believe is that a critical junction. we can come together and show the world that we still have responsible actors. people are watching, do we still have it? i spent a few days last fall meeting with the european leaders meeting with finance ministers and the head of the european commission to try to get a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. we need to lead. uncertainty leads business -- leaves the business is the sidelines. -- at the sidelines. they do not higher, especially with all that cash. confidence matters. it especially matters in our economy. we need long-term fiscal reductions so people can pine for the future. we need to give families and businesses a certainty and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit a
in indonesia and congo and who wants to be levered to two places where they could wake up and be nationalized. >> most money assets are overseas. this gets them a bigger foot hofoothold in the united states. bhp did this. it's not the only mining company getting more leverage in the energy market. >> we'll keep an eye on shares of freeport. this is not your typical deal that investors immediately understand. >> what don't they know about the fiscal cliff? >> they look to be down 10%. >> we'll watch it. as people know in this market, many times the stock price has been going up. we'll keep an eye on this. it may be throwing people. what does it say about copper overall and the price of the metal. >> i worry, by the way, watch energy 21. this is exxi. another company that bought old properties. one of the things that's happening that's driving this, okay, is that there's new technology. american technology that's able to access oil that the big guys have given up on whether it be exxon given up on energy 21 has or bp and it turns out that these fines may have been bigger so pxp takes advantage
? >> absolutely. polls show that republicans would overwhelmingly be blamed if the united states goes over the proverbial fiscal cliff. and that's why president obama has an advantage, because he's willing -- he says, this is what he and his advisers say, he's willing to send the nation off of the fiscal cliff, letting all income tax rates to jump, spending cuts to take hold, investment income rates to jump. he's willing to do that. he thinks republicans would get the political blame. republicans, on the other hand, note that listen, the president's going to have to have another term where he's dealing with what's likely to be a deep recession as a result of these huge income tax jumps. so it's a position that neither man really wants to be in, but talks have completely dried up. yesterday speaker john boehner and president obama did not speak and their staffs did not speak. so really this thing is at a standstill like we've never seen before. >> yeah. so the fact that we're not even talking now. the aides aren't even talking the each other. where does that leave us? how comfortable is eve
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)